News tagged:

art

  • International Conference: Art Born in the Revolution: Russian Art and the State 1917-1932

    International Conference: Art Born in the Revolution: Russian Art and the State 1917-1932

    International Conference: Art Born in the Revolution: Russian Art and the State 1917-1932
    With guest speakers including John Bowlt, Maria Gough, Christina Kiaer, Christina Lodder and Robert Service

    Art Born in the Revolution: Russian Art and the State 1917-1932

    Day one: Courtauld Institute of Art – Friday 24 February, 14:00-18:45. Book tickets
    Day two: Royal Academy of Arts – Saturday 25 February, 10:30-18:30. Book tickets

    The Royal Academy of Arts, in association with the Courtauld Institute of Art, presents a two-day academic conference to coincide with the exhibition Revolution: Russian Art 1917–1932 for scholars, students and those interested in the period.

    Turned overnight into the ruling party, the Bolsheviks aimed to use the power of mass propaganda in order to establish their founding mythology and disseminate their ideas to an overwhelmingly rural and illiterate population. In 1917 the leader of the new Bolshevik state, Vladimir Lenin, proclaimed that culture should support political needs.

    The first day of the conference is held at the Courtauld Institute of Art and aims to address the question of how useful visual art was to the revolution, as well as the ways in which cinema, printed media and consumer goods were used for propaganda purposes. The second day considers the death and immortalisation of key revolutionary figures, such as Lenin, and the consequent establishment of autocratic rule under Stalin, alongside the impact that social, political and economic developments had on the visual arts and culture.

    Organised by Dr Natalia Murray, the Courtauld Institute of Art. Full conference programme below. Please note that each day requires a separate booking.

    Day one: Friday 24 February 2017 - The Courtauld Institute of Art
    2pm – 6.45pm (registration from 1.30pm)
    Tickets £16 (£11 concession)
    Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, WC2R 0RN

    Day two: Saturday 25 February 2017 - The Royal Academy of Arts
    10.30am – 6.30pm (registration from 10am)
    Tickets £50 (including entry into the exhibition, refreshments and drinks)
    Reynolds Room, Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, Mayfair, W1J 0BD

  • ANN: 6th Winter School of the Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts-Tallinn University

    ANN: 6th Winter School of the Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts
    New Natures, Entangled Cultures: Perspectives in Environmental Humanities
    Tallinn University
    23 – 27 January 2017

    For more information see the Winter School website

    How do we imagine nature/culture? How do new environments emerge and how do we design them – deliberately or by chance? The 6th Winter School of the Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts focuses on the notions of “nature” and “culture” as entangled phenomena. Environmental humanities make an effort to overcome the centuries old division between sciences and humanities by stressing that speaking about “nature” and the hybrid forms of naturecultures is of central importance for all disciplines within the humanities.

    We invite doctoral and MA students to think beyond the comfortable binaries of nature and culture and to discuss topics like recycling and hybridity, (eco)nationalism and aesthetics, technology and landscape, corporeality and posthumanism, materiality and animality in order to understand the creative power of “nature” as a cultural metaphor and the intimate interconnectedness between environment and culture.

    The programme of the Winter School consists of: 1) interdisciplinary lectures and discussions conducted by Estonian and guest lecturers; 2) student seminars and slams where graduate participants present and discuss their own research; 3) student workshops outside the customary classroom environment.

    Plenary speakers: Dr. Harriet Hawkins (Royal Holloway, University of London)
    Dr. Dolly Jørgensen (Luleå University of Technology)
    Dr. Timothy LeCain (Montana State University)
    Dr. Jamie Lorimer (University of Oxford)
    Prof. Gregg Mitman (University of Wisconsin – Madison / Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society)
    Prof. David Moon (University of York)
    Prof. Kate Rigby (Bath Spa University)
    Dr. Bronislaw Szerszynski (Lancaster University)

    Hosting institutions:
    School of Humanities, Tallinn University
    Estonian Centre for Environmental History, Tallinn University

    Programme directors:
    Prof. Ulrike Plath (Tallinn University / Estonian Academy of Sciences)
    Prof. Marek Tamm (Tallinn University)

    Programme manager:
    Doris Feldmann (Tallinn University)

    Student coordinator:
    Tiiu-Triinu Tamm (Tallinn University)

  • ANN: New publication: Art in the Flames of War. Western European Paintings in the Collection of the Simferopol Art Museum

    Announcing a new publication by S. I. Kot and L.V. Kudriasheva:
    Art in the Flames of War. Western Western European Paintings in the Collection of the Simferopol Art Museum S. I. Kot and L.V. Kudriasheva

    Art in the Flames of War. Western European Paintings in the Collection of the Simferopol Art Museum: Catalogue and Album Simferopol-Kyiv: Zheribor Publishing House, 2015. 300 pages (in Russian, English, and German)

    28 June
  • CFP: Art and Social Practice in Eastern Europe after Socialism

    CFP: Art and Social Practice in Eastern Europe after Socialism

    We are pleased to announce call for paper proposals for the panel “Art and Social Practice in Eastern Europe after Socialism”, which will be a part of the 2016 Conference of the Universities Art Association of Canada (UAAC). The conference will take place on 27–30 OCT. 2016 UQÀM, Montréal http://www.uaac-aauc.org/montreal-2016

    The deadline for paper proposals is June 24, 2016

    After the collapse of Communism in 1989, former Soviet-bloc countries faced the urge to reintegrate art practice into the international art scene in order to revive national traditions as well as to reassess the Communist past. Nowadays, artists explore art as social practice, commenting on political and post-colonial activism, gender, and environmental issues, and addressing their concerns to a global audience. Eastern European artists deliberately or implicitly reframe the historical experience of former Socialist societies that had been developed under the Marxist ideas of a non-hierarchical society, social order in culture, and politically engaged art. How is the concept of socially significant, class-specific art now implemented and/or contested by artists and audience? We encourage scholars and art practitioners to reflect on how Socialist cultures influenced the contemporary cultural exchange. We invite prospective panelists to link the contemporary social agenda in art to the Socialist ideological background and intellectual legacy of post- Socialist countries. The organizers expect to bring together diverse approaches to the Socialist/social agenda of the past and its influence on visual culture of post-Socialist societies in a global perspective.

    Please, submit your paper proposals (150 words) and short one-page bios/CV to the session chairs:
    Hanna Chuchvaha, Sessional Instructor/Independent scholar, University of Alberta
    Maria Silina, Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, Université du Québec à Montréal