News tagged:

photography

  • Exhibition: Dawn of Manned Space Exploration, Photographed by Leonid Lazarev at The Harriman Institute

    The Kolodzei Art Foundation presents: Dawn of Manned Space Exploration,
    Photographed by Leonid Lazarev at The Harriman Institute, Columbia University
    420 West 118 Street, 12th Floor, NYC
    March 21 to May 20, 2016
    Opening reception for the exhibition on Monday March 21 from 6 to 8 pm.

    Leonid Lazarev is a well‐known Russian photographer, born in 1937 in Moscow. In 1957 he received the Second Prize of International Photo Competition during the 6th World Festival of Youth and Students in Moscow. He graduated from the Moscow Institute of Cinematography (VGIK). Leonid Lazarev is the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including Soviet Woman Magazine (1960), USSR Photo Exhibition (1961, 1962), the International Competition by New Time magazine in 1974, and participant of many exhibitions, including solo shows at PhotoSouz Gallery in Moscow (2008), at Angel Orensanz Foundation in New York (2010); at Russian Cultural Center (Washington DC). From 1961 to 1984 he worked for the International Youth and Students Festival in USSR as the special events photographer for USSR Ministry of Culture. Since 1985 he works as a syndicated photographer with freelance assignments for the Moscow City Department of Cultural Affairs. Photographs by Leonid Lazarev are featured in many publications and books, including Leonid Lazarev: Selected Photographs (2008) and Leonid Lazarev: Moscow ‐ Waiting for the Future (2009). Leonid Lazarev lives and works in Moscow.

    In 2016 the Kolodzei Art Foundation celebrates 25 years of supporting Russian and Eastern European Art.

    The Kolodzei Art Foundation, Inc., a US-based 501(c)(3) not-for-profit public foundation started in 1991, organizes exhibitions and cultural exchanges in museums and cultural centers in the United States, Russia and other countries, often utilizing the considerable resources of the Kolodzei Collection of Russian and Eastern European Art, publishes books on Russian art, and provides art supplies to Russian artists.

    The Kolodzei Collection of Russian and Eastern European Art is one of the world’s largest private art collections, and consists of over 7,000 works, including paintings, drawings, sculptures, photographs and videos, by more than 300 artists from Russia and the former Soviet Union. For additional information visit www.KolodzeiArt.org or email

    Weblink: http://harriman.columbia.edu/event/kolodzei-art-foundation-presents-dawn-manned-space-exploration-photographed-leonid-lazarev

  • Exhibition: Nostalgia by Pavel Romaniko at the Harriman Institute

    Exhibition at the Harriman Institute: Nostalgia by Pavel Romaniko

    Friday, January 29, 2016 to Thursday, March 10, 2016 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Harriman Institute Atrium (420 West 118th Street, 12th Floor)

    Pavel Romaniko was born in Pereslavl – Zalessky, near Moscow, in 1980. He received his MFA in Imaging Arts from Rochester Institute of Technology. The artist works with photographs, video and sculpture to explore gaps in the archive and the collective memory, relying on imagery and symbolism found in both the public realm and his own memory. His work has been featured in numerous exhibitions and collections, including Rovinj Photodays Festival in Croatia, Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College Chicago, Mimi Ferzt Gallery in New York, and the Art Center of Orange Coast College in California. Romaniko divides his time between New York City and Lowell, MA where he is a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts.

    In the early part of the 20th century politicians, activists and artists in Communist Russia were involved in an act of building a Soviet myth, creating a new space-time continuum, while violently eradicating the past by erasing facts from history texts, documents, photographs, and from people’s consciousness. In the process, new histories were fabricated, thus creating a new order, new collective memory turning an entire country and its many cultures into exiles in their own land. In the years since, Vladimir Nabokov’s exploration of nostalgia and reflections on exile, and Ilya Kabakov’s reconstruction of the past, to name a few examples, are all part of a ritualistic return, an obsessive homecoming and anxious preservation of memory. Nostalgia in the work of these artists is palpable and real and has great impact on constructs of cultural memories. They do, however, remind us that the images produced and circulated within a culture need to be carefully examined. Perhaps, when remnants of history are scattered all over with no sign of provenance, they have no ability to tell a story of their own but can only remain in a form of melancholic nostalgia.

    From Mimi Ferzt Gallery, New York:

    The work from Romaniko’s project titled “Nostalgia” commenced in 2008. “Nostalgia” consists of photographs of miniature paper versions of Russian interiors. The artist describes this project as “a reflection on the topic of exile, home and the relationship with one’s past and belonging.” Romaniko manifests his curiosity and the desire to conserve history through the precise reconstruction of the modest yet so precious details of a Russian household or office. Devoid of human presence, Romaniko’s interiors bear an almost palpable air of uncertainty and the urge for change emblematic of Russian social and political landscape. “Kitchen” (2009, pigment print on archival paper) documents the Soviet residential experiment known as the communal apartment. The artist deliberately eschews the haphazard dynamics of communal cooking, allowing the viewer to reflect upon the peculiarities of communal living, both intimate and public. “Work Desk” (2008, pigment print on archival paper) is the artist’s tribute to Russia’s ominous past, with Joseph Stalin’s portrait hovering over a vintage piece of furniture, with paperwork scattered on the floor.

    Exhibit viewing hours: Monday-Friday, 9:00am - 5:00pm, (1/29-3/10)