News

  • ANN: Maya Semina Travel Grant

    We are pleased to announce that the Inaugural Maya Semina Travel Grant has been awarded to Maria Lanko, a graduate student from the University of Aberdeen and a presenter at one of SHERA panels for emerging scholars.

    Maria will present a paper entitled “Participation and Collectivity in Art of the Soviet and Post-Soviet Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine since the 1970s” at the panel Emerging Scholars: Politics and Collective in East European and Russian Art, Part One, which will take place on Wednesday, February 15, from 10:30-12:00, West Ballroom, 3rd Floor, New York Hilton Midtown, in the framework of the 105th Annual College Art Association Conference.

    We are also pleased to remind you that in the years to come one young scholar will be able to participate at a SHERA-sponsored session of CAA or ASEEES with the help of he Maya Semina Travel Grant.

    SHERA

  • ANN: Museum Studies in St. Petersburg, Russia, Summer 2017

    Museum Studies in St. Petersburg, Russia, Summer 2017

    Russia’s rich cultural heritage is complimented by a unique emphasis that Russians place on history and education. This has helped Russia produce one of the world’s most extensive museum systems, one well-known for not only for impressive collections but also thematic versatility, multiplicity of display modes, and sheer number of institutions. With private and public support, many of Russia’s museums are being modernized and new museums are being established. Russians have also supported this as some of the world’s most avid museum enthusiasts.

    Art and Museums in Russia seeks to understand the Russian museum phenomenon and covers wide subject matter. Topics include: the history of collecting, the “museumification” of historic and cultural sites, museum operations (including storage facilities, restoration labs, exhibition curation, education, and development), integration of technology and interactivity, and museum educational work.

    Art and Museums in Russia is for students looking to understand not only Russia’s cultural and historical heritage, but also how cultural and historical heritage can be best preserved and transmitted. Over an intensive three weeks in beautiful St. Petersburg, Russia, we will take a behind-the-scenes look at the Hermitage Museum, and explore a plethora of others including educational museums at schools of higher learning, scientific museums, museums of ethnography, memorial apartment museums, literary museums, political history museums, and more.

    Apply here: http://www.sras.org/study_art_museums_russia

    Program dates: June 18 - July 9, 2017

    Application deadline: April 1, 2017

  • ANN: Performance art in Eastern Europe since 1960

    ANN: Performance art in Eastern Europe since 1960

    Performance art in Eastern Europe since 1960

    By Amy Bryzgel

    This volume presents the first comprehensive academic study of the history and development of performance art in the former communist countries of Central, Eastern and South Eastern Europe since the 1960s. Covering 21 countries and more than 250 artists, this text demonstrates the manner in which performance art in the region developed concurrently with the genre in the West, highlighting the unique contributions of Eastern European artists. The discussions are based on primary source material-interviews with the artists themselves. It offers a comparative study of the genre of performance art in countries and cities across the region, examining the manner in which artists addressed issues such as the body, gender, politics and identity, and institutional critique.

    Publisher: Manchester University Press http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781784994228/

  • CFP: Groups, Coteries, Circles and Guilds. Modernist Aesthetics and the Utopian Lure of Community

    Groups, Coteries, Circles and Guilds. Modernist Aesthetics and the Utopian Lure of Community

    While Modernism, especially literary Modernism, has long been investigated in the wake of the primary role played by individual voices and authorship, critical studies increasingly pay attention to the roles played by group artistry in the elaboration of avant-garde and modernist aesthetics and ethics, and to collaborative efforts bringing together writers, artists and intellectuals, creating at times not just cosmopolitan, but actively transnational communities.

    Collective experiences (circles, little magazines, theatre companies, guilds) challenged the consolidated idea of authorship and creation and are crucial for understanding the writing practices in the first half of the twentieth century. They also very often operated internationally, by either forging allegiances between authors from different national and cultural backgrounds, or by creating connections between single authors across national boundaries.

    In many ways, the utopia of new and unfettered forms of expression seems to go hand in hand with the experimentation of unconventional modes of living. Whether institutionalised or informal, most of these groupings, which were housed both in urban and rural surroundings, involved artists, authors and thinkers from different countries and cultures, working together in a collective attempt to reassess/reformulate the fundamental questions about art, creativity and craft in the light of communal practices and choices.

    The editor is seeking for contributions addressing the following topics in Modernist literature:

    • international and transnational circles, guilds and groups actively promoting utopian programs through artistic experiments and/or unconventional living practices
    • collaborations uniting artists and writers and fostering dialogue between experiments in both the modernist centres and their “margins”
    • collective writing practices challenging institutional perceptions concerning artistic production, authorship with broader political or social agendas

    Please send proposals to: Laura Scuriatti, Bard College, Berlin: l.scuriatti@berlin.bard.edu

  • EXH: A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde

    EXH: A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde

    A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde; curated by Roxana Marcoci and Sarah Suzuki with Hillary Reder; Museum of Modern Art, NYC, through March 12

    Review by Roann Barris, Radford University

    One might be excused for thinking that the entry sign to the exhibition is one of the art works in the show. The assertive, sans serif lettering, which increases in scale, and the angled parallelogram with a circle at its end, speak to the dynamic sense of velocity created by the art of the Russian avant-garde. This economy of design is also seen in El Lissitzky’s cover of Wendingen: barely four forms, two lines, and the title angled between the lines and oriented in the same direction as the grey rectilinear slab. The thin lines continue from the front cover to the back. Indeed, one of the most exciting features of this exhibition is the ample inclusion of such print works, which also includes an array of LEF magazine covers, books designed by Lissitzky, and illustrations by Olga Rozanova. Of course, one cannot overlook the wall of marvelous movie posters by the Stenberg brothers or the room of movies where the films of Sergei Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, and others, are continuously projected.

    Upon entering the exhibition, two things are especially striking: first, the extent of MoMA’s holdings in Russian art is a veritable history of the avant-garde. Simply stunning in its depth and quality, much of it is never on view. We know that Alfred Barr began collecting Russian art on his trip to Russia in the late 1920s, but less widely known is the degree to which this collection continued to grow throughout the twentieth century. A second and equally strong impression is one of synergy. Regardless of medium and artist, there is a recognizable direction of development. There is nothing random or haphazard about the evolution of Constructivism and Suprematism. Yet, isn’t this how we tend to think of it: as an avant-garde that is not held together by style because the artists affirmed that they were against style? Perhaps this show teaches us that style in this case refers to an attitude about velocity, angularity, a sense of dynamism, and most important, about the communication of ideas through composition.

    The New York Times art critic, Roberta Smith, welcomed this show for another, but equally important, reason. In her December 9 assessment of the exhibition, she noted the role of this exhibition as marking a revolutionary change in how the Museum of Modern Art chooses to display its art. Thus, she concludes that a second revolutionary impulse can be observed–-one which, in this case, suggests an approach to exhibitions that is broad, pulls on the entire collection of the Museum, and enables visitors to see just how the synergy I described previously characterized this moment in Russian art.

    The graphic design media may be the most impressive works of all. Although they are not likely to look very different in real life, rarely do we have the opportunity to see so many copies of the radical LEF journal laid out in one place at the same time. Another high point is seeing so many works by one artist together on a single wall or filling a room – the Lissitzky Proun room, for example, and the wall of prints by Lyubov Popova. The individual works may not be newly surprising (although in Popova’s case, they are), but it increases their resonance when so many are seen together. Surely, the artists themselves were aware of this effect as they worked in series.

    A viewer unfamiliar with Russian art is in for an exciting surprise. The visitor who has devoted years to studying this period will also be surprised in a different way – namely by that feature of resonance and the almost dizzying profusion of seeing so many works of Russian art in one place.

    -

    A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde is on view at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, December 3, 2016-March 12, 2017.

    Roann Barris, a professor of art history and Art Department chair, has long been interested in Russian theater and graphic design. Not long ago, she returned to Moscow where she reexamined the materials she had used in her doctoral research on Russian constructivism, and revised much of what she had originally believed.

  • OPP: Cultural Fellowships in Russia

    Cultural Fellowships in Russia

    The Likhachev Foundation (St. Petersburg, Russia) and the Boris Yeltsin Presidential Center (Moscow, Russia), with support of the Committee on External Relations of St. Petersburg, announce a competition for 2-week cultural fellowships in Russia (St. Petersburg) from 15 to 28 May 2017 for foreign professionals in the field of arts and culture who work on projects related to Russian culture and history and aimed at a broad foreign audience. Airfare (economy class) and accommodation in St. Petersburg will be covered by the organizers.

    Until February 15, 2017 the Likhachev Foundation will accept applications from professionals in the field of culture and arts from foreign countries who are currently working on creative projects related to Russian culture, arts, or history. Command of the Russian language is very helpful but not required.
    We accept applications from artists, scholars, writers, managers of museums, theatres, and festivals.
    Students are not eligible.
    Working languages of the program are English and Russian.

    The creative project could be a book (fiction or non-fiction), a museum exhibition project, a theatre production, a theatre or music festival, a film, a photo exhibition, etc. related to Russian culture or history. The creative project should ultimately take place in a country other than the Russian Federation, with the goal being to broaden the audiences’ perception of Russia. The two-week residency in Russia should serve as an important stage in the preparation and realization of the applicant’s cultural project.

    The Likhachev Foundation will prepare individual programs for the Fellows according to their projects’ specifics, to help them achieve maximum results during their fellowships. These programs will include meetings with Russian colleagues, opportunities to work at St. Petersburg museums, libraries, archives, and other organizations.

    The fellowships will be organized from 15 to 28 May 2017 in St. Petersburg (Russia).

    Deadline for submitted applications is February 15, 2017.
    All the recipients of the fellowships will be notified of the review panel decision by March 15, 2017.
    List of fellows will be published on the website of the program by 20 March 2017.

    Application should include:

    CV (including information on Russian language skills, previous creative projects related to Russia, and previous visits to Russia).
    Description of the creative project (up to 3 pages) a book (fiction or non-fiction), a museum exhibition project, a theatre production, a theatre or music festival, a film, a photo exhibition, etc. related to Russian culture or history. It should be clear from the project description why a residency in St. Petersburg is necessary for the applicant’s creative project and which cultural organizations in St. Petersburg the applicant would like to work with.

    Please, email your application in Russian or English to the competition coordinator Mrs. Elena Vitenberg at vitenberg@lfond.spb.ru and elenavitenberg@gmail.com with subject line «application for the fellowship».

    All the applicants will be notified about the receipt of their applications by e-mail.
    If you haven’t received such confirmation within three days after submitting your application, please resubmit your application.
    All the recipients of the fellowships will receive e-mail invitations by 15 March 2017.
    List of fellows will be published on the website of the program by 20 March 2017.

    The D. S. Likhachev International Charitable Foundation
    http://cf.lfond.spb.ru/ The name of the Academician D. S. Likhachev (1906-1999) is symbolic for the 20th century Russian culture. A Russian intellectual, survivor of the Soviet Gulag, a great scientist and thinker, a popular figure, he managed to preserve under the totalitarian regime his integrity, honor, and fealty to Russia. In the 90s he became a moral gold standard for many Russians. During his late years D. S. Likhachev conceived the idea of a humanitarian charitable foundation. The idea was implemented after his death.

    The D. S. Likhachev International Charitable Foundation was founded in St. Petersburg at the end of 2001. The mission for the Foundation had been stated by D. S. Likhachev himself as promotion of the Russian culture, education, humanities as well as affirmation of democratic and humanistic values in the society. The foundation supports both regional and international programs, awards grants, promotes seminars and conferences, publishes books, etc.

    The Boris Yeltsin Presidential Center (Yeltsin Center)
    http://www.yeltsin.ru/ The Boris Yeltsin Presidential Center is a new Russian noncommercial organization, directed at promoting the development of the Institute of Presidency in Russia. The mission of the Boris Yeltsin Presidential Center is to preserve, study, and present to the public the historical legacy of the first president of the Russian Federation. Presidential Center includes a museum, exhibition and discussion center, a branch of the Boris Yeltsin’s Presidential library and Center for information and education activities and expertise. The Yeltsin Center supports activities in the following areas: Education, Culture, Youth, International, Humanitarian Cooperation, Publishing, Literary Awards.

    Committee on External Relations of Saint Petersburg
    (http://www.kvs.spb.ru)[http://www.kvs.spb.ru] The executive authority - The City Administration is the superior executive body of St. Petersburg headed by the Governor of the city and other executive departments - the city committees and the administrative-territorial departments. The St. Petersburg Administration is formed of the Governor, the Government, The Governor’s Chancellery, the city committees and the administrative-territorial departments of the Administration subordinate to him. The Committee on External Relations is responsible for state policy of Saint Petersburg in external relations.

  • CFP: 2017 ASEEES Convention, Chicago, Nov. 9-12

    49th ASEEES Annual Convention
    November 9-12, 2017
    Chicago Marriot Downtown Magnificent Mile
    www.aseees.org/convention

    Convention Theme: Transgressions The 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution inspires the 2017 theme, and invites us to rethink the ways in which cultural, economic, political, social, and international orders are undermined, overthrown, and recast. The theme invites consideration of transgressions broadly and comparatively. Proposals need not be related to the theme. Proposals from all disciplines, historical periods, and geographic foci are welcome.

    February 15 Deadline for all convention proposal submissions & meeting requests

    Accepting submissions for:

    Panels Roundtables Book Discussion Roundtables (New for 2017 – Use the Roundtable submission process) Individual Papers Lightning Round Presentations (New for 2017 – See the call for proposal for details) For more information on the Call for Proposals see: www.aseees.org/convention/cfp

    Please review the rules for participation: www.aseees.org/convention/rules

    We are anticipating a large number of proposals for the 2017 Convention. Individual paper submissions will have a MUCH LOWER chance of being accepted than panel/roundtable proposals. We STRONGLY encourage all interested participants to form, or become part of, a panel proposal. To assist in the process of forming panels, we have created the Panel/Paper Wanted Board. If you are looking for a panel to join or a paper presenter for your panel, please review the proposals on the online board. You can also indicate your willingness to volunteer as chair or discussant. You can also post your requests on the new ASEEES Commons: aseees.hcommons.org/groups/2017-convention-paper-panelist-wanted/ (you must be a current ASEEES member to post on the Commons).

  • CFP: Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public”, December 8-10, 2017, University of Passau, Germany Organizer: DFG Research Training Group 1681/2 “Privacy and Digitalization"

    CFP Conference “Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public”

    by Tatiana Klepikova Conference “Privacy Outside Its ‘Comfort Zone’: Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe between the Private and the Public”, December 8-10, 2017

    Organizer: DFG Research Training Group 1681/2 “Privacy and Digitalization”, University of Passau, Germany

    “Privacy” is a well-researched yet highly disputed concept in Western scholarship. While most privacy research comes from and concentrates on Western liberal societies, great potential of privacy studies beyond this traditional framework still remains largely unexplored. The framework of Western liberal societies may therefore be seen not only as a “comfort zone” of privacy studies, but also as a barrier that often limits the potential of the research. This conference aims at elucidating the problems and the perspectives of privacy studies beyond the traditional liberal framework by bringing together scholars and PhD students who work on the concept of “privacy” in the context of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe.

    A common challenge to privacy researchers of non-Western societies, especially if they come from such a society, is to refute the erroneous misconception of the absence of “privacy” in non-liberal societies, and to embrace the constructions of “privacy” that these local societies offer. This conference endeavors to create a dialogue between scholars and PhD students from all fields of humanities and social and political sciences to discuss the challenges of transgressing the borders of liberal frameworks, the strategies to cope with these challenges, and the perspectives for privacy research that such transgressions offer.

    The use of this concept in the context of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe leads to a range of questions that challenge liberal dichotomies and pave the way for alternative visions of “privacy”. These questions are particularly resonant now, in the centennial year of the October Revolution, when its consequences are debated anew. While the liberal concept of “privacy” usually fails in the framework of authoritarian regimes of post-war Europe, the region offers a diversity of other impulses similar to the liberal idea of “privacy”. In the post-war years, Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe witnessed the expansion of the material as well as immaterial private sphere, which did not only come as a result of the changed world order and subsequent transformations of Socialist societies, but can also be seen as a process that was meticulously planned, carried out, and controlled by the authorities of respective countries in an attempt to stabilize their regimes in the process of de-Stalinization. However, we should also consider whether the private sphere, so benevolently tolerated by Socialist states, continuously developed into an enfant terrible that nurtured not only stability, but also the disruptive forces of dissidence and civil rights movements, which ultimately undermined the Socialist bloc from within. These stabilizing and simultaneously disruptive currents of “privacy” within non-liberal societies are of particular interest, as they elucidate the multifaceted nature of this concept.

    Participants are therefore asked to revisit and question the concept of “privacy” in liberal contexts as well as within the frameworks of Late Socialist Eastern and East-Central Europe by renegotiating the underlying categories within a certain society. The conference will specifically examine ways of addressing the concepts of “privacy” and “publicity” in said contexts by debating the applicable frameworks and by challenging existing approaches. It will further explore the potential of “reverse applicability” by discussing how privacy research in liberal contexts can benefit from other frameworks of privacy—the transfer that is of particular interest now, in the “post-privacy age”, when Snowden’s revelations elucidated the approximations of Western liberal states to the authoritarian models of the past and the present. In the light of such developments, the examination of Late Socialist authoritarian societies becomes advantageous for our understanding of contemporary privacy paradigms.

    The conference will focus on three aspects of the problematics of the private/public dichotomy in Late Socialist societies of Eastern and Central Europe. Subtopics of interest include (but are not limited to):

    Political variations of privacy:

    Concepts of privacy: How does the liberal concept of privacy transform when applied beyond liberal societies? Is a proper transfer possible? Do we need renegotiations of the category?
    (Ab-)use of privacy: In what ways can privacy become instrumental to the aims of certain regimes?
    Challenging Western models: Is the “absence of privacy” to be spoken of only in the non-liberal context? How are non-Western models applicable to the Western world’s continuous failings at privacy in the 21st century?

    Art and privacy:

    Visions of privacy: How was privacy in Socialist societies portrayed by domestic as well as by international literature and cinema?
    “Niches of privacy”: How did the production and reception of art oscillate between the private and the public spheres?

    Privacy in Socialist societies:

    Fluid borders: Where do borders between the private and the public spheres lie in these societies? Which dichotomous, trichotomous, etc. divisions are imaginable?
    Functions of privacy: How do functions of privacy evolve in the Late Socialist societies of Eastern and Central Europe in comparison to the Western model? To what extent are such phenomena as dissidence and samizdat private/public?
    “The private is political”: In which way did Socialism “respond” to the feminist critique of liberal societies that addressed the reduction of the woman’s role to the private sphere and the depoliticization of the said sphere in the Western liberal states?
    Legal ambivalence: How was the private sphere constructed through Socialist laws? How did legal codes of Socialist states simultaneously allow for the invasion of privacy?

    Information for applicants:

    The conference will take place on December 8-10, 2017 at the University of Passau, Germany. The language of the conference is English. We welcome abstract submissions of individual papers (no more than 300 words) until February 28, 2017. Please include the title of your presentation, as well as a short academic CV (max. 150 words), and send us a PDF document at the following E-mail addresses, indicating “Conference Privacy 2017” as the E-mail subject: Lukas.Edeler@uni-passau.de AND Tatiana.Klepikova@uni-passau.de

    We will contribute to the accommodation and travel costs of the participants. The conference will be based on pre-circulated papers that should be submitted until October 1, 2017. We plan to assemble an edited volume on the basis of the conference proceedings.

    For any further questions, please contact Tatiana Klepikova Tatiana.Klepikova@uni-passau.de. For further information about the DFG Research Training Group, please address http://www.privatheit.uni-passau.de/en/.

  • Exhibition: "Oleg Vassiliev: Metro Series & Selected Works on Paper from the Kolodzei Art Foundation"

    Exhibition:

    Exhibition: “Oleg Vassiliev: Metro Series & Selected Works on Paper from the Kolodzei Art Foundation”
    Opening reception on Monday, January 23, 2017, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    at the Harriman Institute Atrium (420 W 118th Street, 12th floor, New York)
    The exhibition on view until March 10, 2017

    Oleg Vassiliev was born in 1931 in Moscow; lived and worked in New York. He died in St. Paul, Minnesota in 2013. He has been the recipient of numerous artistic awards and grants, including from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation (1994 and 2002). In 1999, he was the first recipient of the “Liberty Prize.” His work has been displayed in museum exhibitions across the globe. His prominent solo museum exhibitions include Oleg Vassiliev: Memory Speaks (Themes and Variations) at The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow in 2004 and The State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg in 2005; The Art of Oleg Vassiliev, The Museum of Russian Art, Minneapolis, Minnesota in 2011; Oleg Vassiliev: Space and Light at the Zimmerli Art Museum, New Brunswick in 2014-2015.

    Oleg Vassiliev is regarded as a key member of the Nonconformist Art movement; rather than confining himself to the discussion of contemporary political and societal issues, Vassiliev’s work explores concepts reaching beyond questions of social order. Among his immediate influences are the lyrical realist landscape paintings of Isaac Levitan and Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematist art. As the Russian artist Erik Bulatov puts it, Vassiliev’s painting “connects such disparate lines of development in Russian art as nineteenth-century realist painting, landscape painting in particular, and the avant-garde of the 1910s and 1920s.” Though he immigrated to the United States in 1990, Russia and Russian art continued to play an important role in Vassiliev’s work. Rather than reject past artistic experiments, Vassiliev embraced them, combining traditional artistic concepts with nonconformist ideas and influences from early 20th Century abstract art. The past and present seem to collide in his work, and this work, too, appears timeless—at once belonging to the past and the present. Linked to this idea of timelessness, is the idea of transitional space. Throughout his works, Vassiliev emphasizes the importance of memory. Individual memories, often the starting points of his work, become universal explorations of memory and the act of remembering.

    This exhibit is presented by the Kolodzei Art Foundation, a public foundation (est. 1991) that organizes exhibitions and cultural exchanges in museums and cultural centers in the United States, Russia and other countries, often utilizing the considerable resources of the Kolodzei Collection of Russian and Eastern European Art, publishes books on Russian art, and provides art supplies to Russian artists. The Kolodzei Collection of Russian and Eastern European Art is one of the largest private art collections, and consists of over 7,000 works, including paintings, drawings, sculptures, photographs and videos, by more than 300 artists from Russia and the former Soviet Union. For additional information visit www.KolodzeiArt.org or email Natalia Kolodzei

    For more information click here

  • International Conference: Art Born in the Revolution: Russian Art and the State 1917-1932

    International Conference: Art Born in the Revolution: Russian Art and the State 1917-1932

    International Conference: Art Born in the Revolution: Russian Art and the State 1917-1932
    With guest speakers including John Bowlt, Maria Gough, Christina Kiaer, Christina Lodder and Robert Service

    Art Born in the Revolution: Russian Art and the State 1917-1932

    Day one: Courtauld Institute of Art – Friday 24 February, 14:00-18:45. Book tickets
    Day two: Royal Academy of Arts – Saturday 25 February, 10:30-18:30. Book tickets

    The Royal Academy of Arts, in association with the Courtauld Institute of Art, presents a two-day academic conference to coincide with the exhibition Revolution: Russian Art 1917–1932 for scholars, students and those interested in the period.

    Turned overnight into the ruling party, the Bolsheviks aimed to use the power of mass propaganda in order to establish their founding mythology and disseminate their ideas to an overwhelmingly rural and illiterate population. In 1917 the leader of the new Bolshevik state, Vladimir Lenin, proclaimed that culture should support political needs.

    The first day of the conference is held at the Courtauld Institute of Art and aims to address the question of how useful visual art was to the revolution, as well as the ways in which cinema, printed media and consumer goods were used for propaganda purposes. The second day considers the death and immortalisation of key revolutionary figures, such as Lenin, and the consequent establishment of autocratic rule under Stalin, alongside the impact that social, political and economic developments had on the visual arts and culture.

    Organised by Dr Natalia Murray, the Courtauld Institute of Art. Full conference programme below. Please note that each day requires a separate booking.

    Day one: Friday 24 February 2017 - The Courtauld Institute of Art
    2pm – 6.45pm (registration from 1.30pm)
    Tickets £16 (£11 concession)
    Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, WC2R 0RN

    Day two: Saturday 25 February 2017 - The Royal Academy of Arts
    10.30am – 6.30pm (registration from 10am)
    Tickets £50 (including entry into the exhibition, refreshments and drinks)
    Reynolds Room, Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, Mayfair, W1J 0BD