News tagged:

cfp

  • CFP: Groups, Coteries, Circles and Guilds. Modernist Aesthetics and the Utopian Lure of Community

    Groups, Coteries, Circles and Guilds. Modernist Aesthetics and the Utopian Lure of Community

    While Modernism, especially literary Modernism, has long been investigated in the wake of the primary role played by individual voices and authorship, critical studies increasingly pay attention to the roles played by group artistry in the elaboration of avant-garde and modernist aesthetics and ethics, and to collaborative efforts bringing together writers, artists and intellectuals, creating at times not just cosmopolitan, but actively transnational communities.

    Collective experiences (circles, little magazines, theatre companies, guilds) challenged the consolidated idea of authorship and creation and are crucial for understanding the writing practices in the first half of the twentieth century. They also very often operated internationally, by either forging allegiances between authors from different national and cultural backgrounds, or by creating connections between single authors across national boundaries.

    In many ways, the utopia of new and unfettered forms of expression seems to go hand in hand with the experimentation of unconventional modes of living. Whether institutionalised or informal, most of these groupings, which were housed both in urban and rural surroundings, involved artists, authors and thinkers from different countries and cultures, working together in a collective attempt to reassess/reformulate the fundamental questions about art, creativity and craft in the light of communal practices and choices.

    The editor is seeking for contributions addressing the following topics in Modernist literature:

    • international and transnational circles, guilds and groups actively promoting utopian programs through artistic experiments and/or unconventional living practices
    • collaborations uniting artists and writers and fostering dialogue between experiments in both the modernist centres and their “margins”
    • collective writing practices challenging institutional perceptions concerning artistic production, authorship with broader political or social agendas

    Please send proposals to: Laura Scuriatti, Bard College, Berlin: l.scuriatti@berlin.bard.edu

  • CFP: 2017 ASEEES Convention, Chicago, Nov. 9-12

    49th ASEEES Annual Convention
    November 9-12, 2017
    Chicago Marriot Downtown Magnificent Mile
    www.aseees.org/convention

    Convention Theme: Transgressions The 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution inspires the 2017 theme, and invites us to rethink the ways in which cultural, economic, political, social, and international orders are undermined, overthrown, and recast. The theme invites consideration of transgressions broadly and comparatively. Proposals need not be related to the theme. Proposals from all disciplines, historical periods, and geographic foci are welcome.

    February 15 Deadline for all convention proposal submissions & meeting requests

    Accepting submissions for:

    Panels Roundtables Book Discussion Roundtables (New for 2017 – Use the Roundtable submission process) Individual Papers Lightning Round Presentations (New for 2017 – See the call for proposal for details) For more information on the Call for Proposals see: www.aseees.org/convention/cfp

    Please review the rules for participation: www.aseees.org/convention/rules

    We are anticipating a large number of proposals for the 2017 Convention. Individual paper submissions will have a MUCH LOWER chance of being accepted than panel/roundtable proposals. We STRONGLY encourage all interested participants to form, or become part of, a panel proposal. To assist in the process of forming panels, we have created the Panel/Paper Wanted Board. If you are looking for a panel to join or a paper presenter for your panel, please review the proposals on the online board. You can also indicate your willingness to volunteer as chair or discussant. You can also post your requests on the new ASEEES Commons: aseees.hcommons.org/groups/2017-convention-paper-panelist-wanted/ (you must be a current ASEEES member to post on the Commons).

  • CFP: ALL THINGS LIVING AND NOT

    CFP: ALL THINGS LIVING AND NOT
    an interdisciplinary conference on non-anthropocentric perspectives in Slavic studies

    FEBRUARY 23-25, 2017

    The Harriman Institute
    Columbia University, New York

    withouthumans.weebly.com

    KEYNOTE: EWA DOMANSKA
    (History & Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University & Stanford)

    STREAM LEADERS:
    JANE COSTLOW (Environmental History, Bates College)
    SERGUEI OUSHAKINE (Slavic & Anthropology, Princeton)
    OXANA TIMOFEEVA (Political Science & Philosophy, European University at St. Petersburg)

    To participate, please send a 300-word abstract for a 20-minute presentation by 1 November 2016 to withouthumans@gmail.com

    The last two decades have witnessed a revision in the concept of alterity, decentering the human in how we reckon with the other. Animal studies, artificial intelligence, ecocriticism, etc. not only ask us to consider the possibility of non-human subjects, but also challenge our very humanness and, along with it, the very premises of the humanities and human sciences. What does a non-anthropocentric understanding of the other offer to the field of Slavic studies? And conversely, what can the cultures, histories, and belief systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia reveal about practices and possibilities of radical alterity?

    Three provocations:

    • In defining the post-human as a radically disembodied state, thinkers like Katherine Hayles paradoxically continue to work within a particular humanist tradition closely linked to the Enlightenment and Western Christianity that excises the body from philosophical concerns. How do features of the post-human change when set against the historical experience of Eastern Europe? How does a Marxist emphasis on materiality, for instance, or Orthodox Christian conception of entrenchment in matter affect our understanding of alterity?

    • What kind of autonomy is cached in the nonhuman actors of Bruno Schulz’s ecosystem: mannequins, crustaceans, and humans whose bodies disintegrate into piles of tubing? What anxieties are expressed in Karel Čapek’s dystopic visions of intelligent newts and universal robots? Can these be seen as instances of “strategic anthropomorphism,” as conscious attempts to decenter the human?

    • On July 1, 2016, 200 watermelons were hurled at the façade of the Central Community Police Station of Belgrade, Serbia. The action protested the harassment of a watermelon vendor by the police, which had led to the man’s death. In an environment lacking in functional tools for collective communication and dissent, can a smashed watermelon open a new seam in the impasse between violence and impotence? Can the material meat of culture articulate a political language more powerful than human speech?

    This conference asks participants to consider the conjunction between the animal, the plant, the machine, inorganic matter, and the human as a way to destabilize the mind-body dichotomy, class, race, gender, age, etc. By bringing Slavic studies into closer contact with a set of discourses referred to as posthumanism, our conference aims to expand the theoretical apparatus of our field and to allow for new perspectives on the histories and cultures of the region.

    Since the very notion of posthumanism arises from the cross-pollination of different disciplines, we invite scholars working in all fields whose subject matter relates to the Central and Eastern European and Eurasian region to submit 300-word abstracts to withouthumans@gmail.com by 1 November 2016. Each proposal will be matched to one of three streams led by senior scholars in the field: Jane Costlow, Serguei Oushakine, and Oxana Timofeeva. The conference is paired with the 2017 issue of Ulbandus: The East European, Slavic and Eurasian Journal of Columbia University.

    The conference is organized by Irina Denischenko, Bradley Gorski, and Eliza Rose with the generous support of the Harriman Institute, Ulbandus: The Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Review of Columbia University, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Institute of Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University.

    Conference website

    24 October
  • CFP: Centennial, Commemoration, Catastrophe: 1917-2017 as Past and Present in Russia and Beyond

    CFP: Centennial, Commemoration, Catastrophe: 1917-2017 as Past and Present in Russia and Beyond
    Young Researchers Conference, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Miami University
    13-16 June 2017. Villa Vergiliana, Cuma, Italy

    Discussing the Russian revolution is impossible without addressing the causes, legacy, and echoes of this event. The very phrasing is contentious—was 1917 a revolution, overthrow, or accident? Examining the Russian and Soviet response is complex enough, yet the Bolshevik takeover had ramifications for the world. In literature the image of the revolution and the ensuing changes was polarized from the beginning, both in the new Soviet state and abroad. Those in history and the social sciences have long puzzled over interpreting the USSR, its influence on Eastern Europe (and the developing world), and the aftermath of its collapse. In otherwise disparate regions—from eastern Germany to Central Asia and the Russian Far East—1917 and the USSR defined the twentieth century, whether as horrific trauma, utopian promises, or a confounding combination of the two. How our field responds to the Russian revolution will define Eurasian studies for the coming decades, just as experts continue to debate the significance of other cultural markers such as 1905, 1956, and 1989.

    The Young Researchers Conferences welcomes papers by scholars of literature, history, political science, anthropology, cultural studies, art history, gender studies, religion, and similar areas, as well as fields not traditionally represented at Eurasian studies conferences (for example, Middle Eastern studies, psychology). Papers should examine how 1917 influenced events in politics, economics, literature, religion, art, or culture, whether in the former Second World or beyond its borders.

    The conference will feature the following keynote speakers:
    Catriona Kelly (Oxford)
    Boris Kolonitskii (European University at St. Petersburg)

    Eligibility:
    The Young Researchers Conference welcomes papers from those who are completing their dissertation or have received their Ph.D. (or candidate degree) within the past three years.

    Form of the Conference:
    Participants will prepare a paper to be circulated well in advance and read by all conference presenters, chairs, and discussants. During the conference presenters will have 15 minutes to summarize their findings. The small number of participants and mix of junior and senior scholars make the Young Researchers Conference an excellent venue for both advancing research projects and networking with leading and upcoming figures in a wide range of fields. The working language of the conference is English.

    Submitting Abstracts and CVs:
    Please submit by November 21, 2016 a one-page, single-spaced abstract (including tentative bibliography) as well as a one page, singled-spaced curriculum vitae to Benjamin Sutcliffe, Professor of Russian, Miami University. Participants will be notified by January 15 if they have been selected for the conference.

    Financial Support:
    The conference will be held in Cuma, Italy, which is located on the Bay of Naples, one hour drive from Naples, and an hour and a half from Capri. The train ride from Rome’s Termini train station is about 1-1/2 hours. The Havighurst Center will provide all meals and 3 nights (shared room) at the Villa Vergiliana in Cuma. Participants will be responsible for all travel to and from the Villa, including international travel. Scholars are urged to seek support from their institutions.

    24 September
  • CFP: Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia

    CFP: Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia

    We would like to invite you to submit articles to Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia, a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Post-totalitarian Studies of the Institute of Slavic Studies (University of Wroclaw, Poland) and indexed in Czasopisma Naukowe w Sieci (CNS), The Central European Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (CEJSH), and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA, ProQuest). We are seeking for essays and reviews for an issue on Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe, which will be devoted to mapping new phenomena in children’s literature and media culture that have emerged during the transition from late communism to late capitalism. As Anikó Imre argues in Globalization and the Transformation of Media Cultures in the New Europe (2009), children from Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe are post-communist subjects for whom communism is an inherited memory, whose perspectives, values and skills differ from those of older generations, and whose subjectivities are developing in the shadow of adults’ anxieties about this divide. As sources of knowledge and social capital, children’s cultural products both reflect and attempt to resolve tensions caused by the formation of new individual and collective subjectivities. Exploration of regional, European and global affiliations shaping contemporary children’s culture in post-communist Europe offers a vital contribution to a broader inquiry into processes of cultural change and their significance for the formation of national identity in post-totalitarian countries. Contributions are welcomed from a range of fields, such as popular culture, new media, games, literature, education, and childhood.

    Possible areas of investigation:
    -reflective and restorative nostalgia for communist children’s entertainment vs. technoeuphoria, neoliberalism, and the celebration of transnational mobility -childhood heritage -globalization vs. localization -children’s culture and Eurocentric values (e.g. the “Catching up with Europe” project, a pan-European democracy, the EuropaGO project) -children’s relations with interactive media, peer-to-peer technologies and participatory culture -edutainment vs. centralized, nationalized and literature-based education -children’s culture and citizenship education -nationalisms, ethnocentrism, homophobia, misogyny, racism, and xenophobia in children’s culture -relations between children’s and adult media cultures -children’s books markets -promotion of children’s literature and culture

    Essay should be sent to Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak and Mateusz Świetlicki by 10th April 2017. Submissions should be 5000-6000 words. We will aim to reply to authors by 20th April 2017, with the aim of arranging reviews and completing revisions for 15th June and publication by the end of 2017. Please keep in mind that the essays must satisfy the formal requirements provided below.

    Guest Editors
    Dr. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (Institute of English Studies, University of Wroclaw) and Dr. Mateusz Świetlicki (Institute of Slavic Studies, University of Wroclaw)

    GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

    -The submitted text must be accompanied by an abstract and title of the article (max. 150 words); five key words; a biographical note (affiliation; title or degree; position held; research interests; current work address and email – max. 80 words). -The name(s) and affiliation(s) of the author(s) should be listed in the upper left-hand corner of the first page:

    Marianna Zacharska

    Uniwersytet Jagielloński (Kraków, Polska)

    Formatting and Style Guide:

    a) Standard printout: 30 lines per page; 60 characters per line (1800 characters with spaces per page); justified text; margins: top, bottom – 2,5; left – 3,5, right – 1,5
    b) font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
    c) title of the article – centered, font – 14 point size.
    d) spacing: 1,5 in the main text; single spaced in the footnotes.
    e) titles of literary works cited in the text for the first time should be accompanied by the original title (not in transliteration) and the date of publication in parentheses; titles of literary works should be italicized (do not use quotation marks).
    f) quotations should be given in the original language (not in transliteration); longer quotations (more than 40 words) should be set apart from the surrounding text, in block format, indented from the left margin, and single spaced; font: 10 point size.
    g) names appearing in the text for the first time should be given in full.

    FOOTNOTES should be placed at the bottom of the page on which the reference appears. Use continuous footnote numbering.

    a) bibliographic description in the footnotes should be given in the original language; please follow the examples:
    a. Book:
    J. Smith, History, Warsaw 2009, p. 25.
    Ibidem, s. 15.
    J. Smith, History, op. cit., p. 37.

    b. Excerpts from publications of the same author:

    M. Shamone, Rap Culture, [in:] eadem, The History of Music, New York 2012, pp. 67-98.

    Ibidem, p. 75.

    M. Shamone, Rap Culture, op. cit., p. 90.

    c. Chapter in a collective work:

    M. Blake, Feminism and Masculinity, trans. by I. Kurz, [in:] Gender Studies, ed. A. Johnes et al. introduction by M. Sahara, London 2008, pp. 109-117.

    d. Journal article:

    E. Noovy, Jane Austen and Romanticisms „English Studies” 2006, no. 1, pp. 32-73.

    e. Online journal article:

    A. Adams, American History, „SSHA” 14 July 2013 [http://tssha.com/Society/69385/PrintView – accessed: 20.01.20013].

    BIBLIOGRAPHY/REFERENCE LIST:

    Reference list or bibliography should be included at the end of the text.
    The word bibliography should be in bold and aligned to the left. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
    List the sources in alphabetical order by the authors’ last names.
    All sources must be justified and 1.5–spaced. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
    Use: The Chicago Manual of Style

  • CFP: ARTMargins Online

    CFP: ARTMargins Online

    CFP: ARTMargins Online

    Interested in writing about contemporary art practice in Eastern Europe, Russia, or the former Soviet Union?

    ARTMargins Online accepts previously unpublished interviews, essays, reviews/review articles, blogs, podcasts and videos devoted to contemporary art, with a focus on the region formerly known as Eastern Europe.

    Please address submissions and all other correspondence to the managingeditor@artmargins.com

    For more information on ARTMargins Online go to: www.artmargins.com

  • CFP: EAHN Fifth International Meeting (Tallinn, 13-16 Jun 18)

    CFP: EAHN Fifth International Meeting (Tallinn, 13-16 Jun 18)

    Tallinn, Estonia, June 13 - 16, 2018
    Deadline: Dec 12, 2016

    EAHN Fifth International Meeting
    Call for Sessions and Round-Tables

    Deadline: December 12, 2016

    European Architectural History Network (EAHN) is organising its fifth pan-European meeting in Tallinn, Estonia, from June 13-16, 2018. In accordance with its mission statement, the meeting aims to increase the visibility of the discipline; to foster transcultural, transnational and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of the built environment; and to facilitate the exchange of research results in the field. Although the scope of the meeting is European, members of the larger scholarly community are invited to submit proposals related not only to European architecture but also to that of the rest of the world. The main purpose of the meeting is to map the general state of research in disciplines related to the built environment, to promote discussion of current themes and concerns, and to foster new directions for research in the field. Session proposals are intended to cover different periods in the history of architecture and different approaches to the built environment, including landscape and urban history. Parallel sessions will consist of either five papers or four papers and a respondent, with time for dialogue and questions at the end. In addition, there will be a number of round-table debates addressing burning issues in the field. Proposals are sought for round-table debates that re-map, re-define or outline the current state of the discipline. They will consist of a discussion between panel members, but will also encourage debate with the audience. The goal is to create a forum for scholars to present and discuss their ideas, research materials and methodologies.

    Scholars wishing to chair a scholarly session or round-table debate at Tallinn 2018 are invited to submit proposals by December 12, 2016 to Dr. Andres Kurg, General Chair of the EAHN Fifth International Meeting, Institute of Art History and Visual Culture, Estonian Academy of Arts, Suur-Kloostri 11, Tallinn 10133, Estonia.

    Duties of the chairs of session and of round-tables include: selecting from the proposals submitted for presentation by the agreed deadline; communicating the list of speakers and titles to the conference organisers by the agreed deadline; and submitting material for the proceedings to the conference organisers by the agreed deadline. Chairs will not be eligible for selection as speakers in their own or any other session or round table at the conference.

    All chairs and selected presenters and speakers are required to obtain membership of EAHN (available for an annual membership fee at http://www.eahn.org/members-2/) prior to registration at the conference. Chairs are expected to pursue their own institutional or other support for membership, registration, travel and accommodation.

    Proposals in English, of no more than 400 words, including a session or round-table title, should summarise the subject and the premise. Please include name, professional affiliation (if applicable), address, telephone, e-mail address and a current CV. Proposals and short CVs should be submitted by e-mail, including the texts in both the body of the mail and as attachments.

    Session and round-table proposals will be selected on the basis of merit and the need to organize a well-balanced programme. Please note: preference will be given to proposals from chairs who have not hosted a session in the previous biennial conference (Dublin 2016). The International Scientific Committee may organise additional open sessions, depending on the response to this call.

    The complete Call for Sessions and Round-Tables can be downloaded from the Conference website.

  • CFP: Art as Cultural Diplomacy (Bologna, 14 - 15 Oct 16)

    CFP: Art as Cultural Diplomacy (Bologna, 14 - 15 Oct 16)

    Bologna, Italy
    October 14 - 15, 2016
    Deadline: Sep 9, 2016

    Art as Cultural Diplomacy: (Re)Constructing Notions of Eastern and Western Europe

    Part of the Fifth Euroacademia International Conference ‘The European Union and the Politicization of Europe’

    Panel Proposed by Cassandra Sciortino, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Panel Description:

    The panel “Art as cultural diplomacy” seeks papers that explore the function of art (in its broadest definition) as an instrument of cultural diplomacy by the state and, especially, by nongovernmental actors. The main theme of the session is the question of art and diplomacy in Europe before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Papers are welcome which explore issues related to the role of art, diplomacy and the politicization of the European Union and its candidate countries, as are those which consider how the arts have pursued or resisted East-West dichotomies and other narratives of alterity in Europe and worldwide. The panel seeks to combine a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives to explore how art—its various practices, history, and theory—are an important area of inquiry in the expanding field of cultural diplomacy.

    Some examples of topics include:
    ~ How can art serve as a neutral platform for exchange to promote dialogue and understanding between foreign states?
    ~ How can art, including organized festivals (i.e. film, art, music.)
    cultivate transnational identities that undermine dichotomies of East and West, and other narratives of alterity in Europe and beyond it?
    ~ The implications for art as an instrument of diplomacy in a postmodern age where geopolitics and power are increasingly mobilized by image based structures of persuasion
    ~ How has/can art facilitate cohesion between European Union member states and candidate states that effectively responds to the EU’s efforts to create “unity in diversity.”
    ~ The politics of mapping Europe: mental and cartographic
    ~ Community based art as a social practice to engage issues of European identity
    ~ The difference between art as cultural diplomacy and propaganda
    ~ The digital revolution and the emergence of social media as platforms
    for art to communicate across social, cultural, and national boundaries?
    ~ Diplomacy in the history of art in Europe and Eastern Europe
    ~ Artists as diplomats
    ~ Art history as diplomacy—exhibitions, post-colonial criticism, global art history, and other revisions to the conventional boundaries of Europe and its history of art
    ~ The international activity of cultural institutes

    For full details of the conference and on-line application please see:
    http://euroacademia.eu/conference/fifth-eu-and-the-politicization-of-europe/

  • CFP: Art and Social Practice in Eastern Europe after Socialism

    CFP: Art and Social Practice in Eastern Europe after Socialism

    We are pleased to announce call for paper proposals for the panel “Art and Social Practice in Eastern Europe after Socialism”, which will be a part of the 2016 Conference of the Universities Art Association of Canada (UAAC). The conference will take place on 27–30 OCT. 2016 UQÀM, Montréal http://www.uaac-aauc.org/montreal-2016

    The deadline for paper proposals is June 24, 2016

    After the collapse of Communism in 1989, former Soviet-bloc countries faced the urge to reintegrate art practice into the international art scene in order to revive national traditions as well as to reassess the Communist past. Nowadays, artists explore art as social practice, commenting on political and post-colonial activism, gender, and environmental issues, and addressing their concerns to a global audience. Eastern European artists deliberately or implicitly reframe the historical experience of former Socialist societies that had been developed under the Marxist ideas of a non-hierarchical society, social order in culture, and politically engaged art. How is the concept of socially significant, class-specific art now implemented and/or contested by artists and audience? We encourage scholars and art practitioners to reflect on how Socialist cultures influenced the contemporary cultural exchange. We invite prospective panelists to link the contemporary social agenda in art to the Socialist ideological background and intellectual legacy of post- Socialist countries. The organizers expect to bring together diverse approaches to the Socialist/social agenda of the past and its influence on visual culture of post-Socialist societies in a global perspective.

    Please, submit your paper proposals (150 words) and short one-page bios/CV to the session chairs:
    Hanna Chuchvaha, Sessional Instructor/Independent scholar, University of Alberta
    Maria Silina, Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, Université du Québec à Montréal